Coneflowers

Coneflowers

I love the look of the coneflower, with its long stem and cheerful, daisy-like bloom on top. It was originally a North American Prairie flower and actually has the ability to release a chemical that inhibits the growth of grasses around it. Talk about determined to survive and thrive. Of course, it’s in the nature of us humans to experiment so the flower is grown in gardens all across the country now. Even here in the desert, I’m hoping to have a few blooms in my own backyard. By the way, the scientific term for coneflower is echinacea and the Plains Indians had many medicinal uses for the roots of this plant.  

Here’s a short video of some of the more recent additions to the coneflower market including one cultivar called ‘Butterfly Kisses’. Here’s a six-minute video on growing and transplanting coneflowers. Here’s a short video, produced with mom and young son, to show us how to collect coneflowers seeds. Very cool.

FunFacts about Coneflowers: (Source) (Source)  

  • Coneflower is the common name of Echinacea.
  • Here’s some basic information about coneflowers: Echinacea is a genus, or group of herbaceous flowering plants in the daisy family. The genus Echinacea has nine species, which are commonly called coneflowers. They are found only in eastern and central North America, where they grow in moist to dry prairies and open wooded areas. They have large, showy heads of composite flowers, blooming from early to late summer. (Source)
  • Coneflowers are drought-resistant.
  • Coneflowers make excellent cutting flowers.
  • Echinacea products vary widely because many species of the plant can be used in the preparation.
  • Echinacea root preparation accounts for 9% of the global herbal-remedies market.
  • The North American Plains Indians were known to use coneflowers as medicine, quote: The Kiowa used it for coughs and sore throats, the Cheyenne for sore throats, the Pawnee for headaches, and many tribes including the Lakotah used it as a pain medication. (Source)
  • When coneflower plants are well-established, they can be dug up and divided to transplant to other places in the yard.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats B.N.!

For a chance to win this paranormal romance bracelet, scroll to the bottom of the page and read the details for entering. You will be leaving a comment as the entry requirement. Giveaway ends midnight, Arizona time, May 10, 2018.

First May winner: Debra G.

April Winners: Shannon C., Marie S., Melanie C., and Catedid!

(Photos from Pixabay)

I hope you enjoyed these photos. Be sure to keep scrolling to leave a comment for the weekly prize draw. Details below!

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*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats B.N.!

First May winner: Debra G.

April Winners: Shannon C., Marie S., Melanie C., and Catedid!

To be in the running for this handcrafted paranormal romance bracelet, made by yours truly, please leave a comment at the bottom of this post. Also, feel free to post comments on every Caris Roane blog, Monday thru Thursday this week, to increase your chances of winning this week’s prize drawing. Only one win per month allowed!

New contest ends midnight, Arizona time, on Thursday, May 10, 2018! On Friday, May 11th, Arizona time, I’ll select the winning blog then the winning comment. I’ll use Random.org to make my selection! You may only win once per month. International winner receives gift card.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats B.N.!

To be entered into the giveaway drawing, please leave a comment about Coneflowers. Do you grow them in your garden? Have you ever seen a field full of them? Which photo did you like best? Feel free to share whatever comes to mind and share from the heart.

*** And tell us where you’re from! I’m from Buckeye, Arizona, not far from Phoenix. (That’s the Desert Southwest, USA.) ***

Above all: Live the fang!!!