Cumbria

Cumbria

The Lake District, Herdwick sheep, William Wordsworth, ancient stone henges, gorgeous lake-after-lake, amazing hiking trails, the tallest mountain in England, Hadrian’s Wall, friendly pubs and tons of B & Bs. It’s no wonder over fifteen million people visit this northwesterly part of England each year. At times, the mountainous land is rugged. At other times, it’s a lovely glide of picturesque farms dotted with sheep. Beautiful Cumbria.

The Lake District

The Lake District

In 1820, William Wordsworth published his ‘Guide through the District of the Lakes’ which began a popular and ongoing movement to experience this extraordinary and beautiful part of the English countryside. Over 15 million people visit this area each year.

Herdwick Sheep

Herdwick Sheep

At Yew Tree Farm in Coniston, Cumbria, you can enjoy a ‘Herdwick sheep experience’ at a place once owned by Beatrix Potter. Though I embarked on this blog topic for the simple reason that I found the Herdwick sheep adorable and the setting of the Lake District picturesque beyond words, I soon discovered that Herdwick sheep were a lifetime passion of Beatrix’s. She raised them and showed them and won numerous awards. Upon her passing she donated several farms to Britain’s National Trust in order to help preserve these unique sheep and their place in British history documented since the 12th century.

Sierra Nevada Mountains

Sierra Nevada Mountains

As home to three national parks, the highest point in the contiguous United States, and the highest alpine lake in the country ~ Lake Tahoe ~ The Sierra Nevada Mountains is one of the world’s great natural beauties. The range is 400 miles long and a band along its western slopes is home to the most massive trees in the world ~ the giant sequoia. 

Yosemite

Yosemite

The Ahwahnechee people, who first inhabited Yosemite Valley as far back as 3000 years ago, said of Bridalveil Falls that breathing the mist would increase the chance of marriage. Yosemite, especially the valley of the same name, is full of magic, wonder and sheer grandeur. On one side is the iconic El Capitan granite monolith and on the other, farther down the valley is famous Half Dome. With so much natural beauty and diversity, it’s no wonder that Yosemite sees as many as five million visitors each year. 

Lake Tahoe

Lake Tahoe

“To breathe the same air as angels, you must go to Tahoe.” Mark Twain, 1870s.

Peru

Peru

As the home of the famous Incan Empire, Peru is an amazing country. Because of its range of geography, from desert coastal lands, to the Andes Mountains, to the Amazon basin, Peru has extensive micro-climates and is one of the most bio-diverse places on planet Earth. It is also home to Lake Titicaca, the highest navigable lake in the world, as well as the iconic ruins of Machu Picchu.

Lake Titicaca

Lake Titicaca

At over 12,000 feet (3800 m), Lake Titicaca is known as the world’s ‘highest navigable lake’. It is located in the Andes mountains and has been inhabited by indigenous peoples for thousands of years, including the Incas and the Tiwanaku

Vicunas

Vicunas

A shy, sweet-natured camelid and the national animal of Peru, vicunas have been part of Andean life since the Incas. The wool from vicunas is extremely fine and in times past was only worn by Incan royalty. A vicuna sport coat today costs in the range of $21,000.

Rivers

Rivers

Do you have a specific idea in mind about what constitutes the size of rivers, streams, and creeks? How about brooks or rills? I’ve always thought of rivers as big, streams as much smaller, and creeks with only a narrow flow of water.  But this is totally subjective on my part. Apparently there is no universal definition for the size of rivers and their smaller counterparts. What is your view of it or from your part of the world? How we view the geography around us is often a matter of regional interpretation.