Foxglove

Foxglove

Though originally from Europe, Africa and Asia, foxglove is often found in seed mixes for wildflowers in the U.S. Foxglove is a gorgeous, stately plant that produces a spike in its second year with an abundance of curved, trumpet-like flowers. These spikes can grow quite tall and sometimes need to be staked. Foxglove is a familiar flower in English cottage gardens. It is known by the scientific name, ‘digitalis’, is a highly toxic plant and is used for making certain heart medications.

Foxglove Videos: Here’s a 3-minute video with basic info about foxglove. Here’s another 3-minute video with more info about foxglove.

FunFacts about Foxglove: (Source)

  • Basic information, quote: Digitalis is a genus of about 20 species of herbaceous perennials, shrubs, and biennials commonly called foxgloves. This genus was traditionally placed in the figwort family Scrophulariaceae, but recent phylogenetic research has placed it in the much enlarged family. This genus is native to western and southwestern Europe, western and central Asia and northwestern Africa. (Source)
  • The scientific name ‘digitalis’ means “finger-like” and refers to how easy it is to fit the flower over a human fingertip.
  • Foxglove flowers grow on tall, tubular spikes.
  • The flowers can be purple, pink, white, and yellow.
  • The best known foxglove is the common foxglove, Digitalis purpurea.
  • The flowers can have all kinds of markings, including spots.
  • One particular moth, the foxglove pug, lays eggs so that its larvae can consume the flowers of the common foxglove for food.
  • Medications, quote: The term digitalis is also used for drug preparations that contain cardiac glycosides, particularly one called digoxin, extracted from various plants of this genus. (Source)
  • Soil preference and habitats for foxglove, quote: Digitalis species thrive in acidic soils, in partial sunlight to deep shade, in a range of habitats, including open woods, woodland clearings, moorland and heath margins, sea-cliffs, rocky mountain slopes and hedge banks. It is commonly found on sites where the ground has been disturbed, such as recently cleared woodland, or where the vegetation has been burnt. (Source)
  • All parts of the foxglove plant are toxic which has earned the plant the nicknames ‘dead man’s bells’ and ‘witch’s gloves’.

   * * * This Week’s Giveaway * * *

For a chance to win this paranormal romance bracelet ~ ~ or a $15 Amazon gift card, winner’s choice! ~ ~ just scroll to the bottom of the page and read the details for entering. You will be leaving a comment as the entry requirement. Giveaway ends midnight, Arizona time, Wednesday, September 25, 2019.

September Winners: BN, Linda K., Lynn G.!

August Winners: Smita D. (yes, each commenter has a chance to win one bracelet each month!), Bobbie B., Mary P., Denise H.!

Disclaimer: As with any food, herbal remedy, beverage or concept on this blog, be sure to contact your physician before eating, imbibing or using for medical purposes any substance discussed on this blog. Always err on the side of caution and keep yourself well-informed. ~ Caris Roane

(Unless otherwise designated, today’s photos are from Pixabay ~ Pixabay is a free site, so feel free to share, pin and enjoy these wonderful photos. Any photo designated as coming from Deposit Photos has been purchased and is subject to copyright law.) 

I hope you enjoyed these photos. Be sure to keep scrolling to leave a comment for the weekly prize draw. Details below!

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 * * * This Week’s Giveaway * * *

September Winners: BN, Linda K., Lynn G.!

August Winners: Smita D. (yes, each commenter has a chance to win one bracelet each month!), Bobbie B., Mary P., Denise H.!

To be in the running for this handcrafted paranormal romance bracelet, made by yours truly, OR a $15 Amazon Gift Card, please leave a comment at the bottom of this post. Also, feel free to post comments on both Caris Roane blogs ~~ Monday and Wednesday ~~ to increase your chances of winning this week’s prize drawing. Only one win per month allowed, otherwise no limits!

New contest ends midnight, Arizona time, on Wednesday, September 25, 2019! On Thursday, September 26th, Arizona time, I’ll select the winning blog then the winning comment. I’ll use Random.org to make my selection! You may only win once per month. International winner receives gift card.

 * * * This Week’s Giveaway * * *

To be entered into the giveaway drawing, please leave a comment about the beautiful foxglove plant. Have you ever grown this flower in your garden? Which photo did you like best?

*** And tell us where you’re from! I’m from Buckeye, Arizona, not far from Phoenix. (That’s the Desert Southwest, USA.) ***

Above all: Live the fang!!!

31 thoughts on “Foxglove

  1. I find it amazing how toxic flowers can be the prettiest. The contrasting inside of the flower to the outside certainly cements my belief that Mother Nature is the best artist. Thank you for making my day by sharing these gorgeous flowers!

    Fort Myers, Florida

  2. Loved the pictures and videos. Amazes me that usually the most beautiful flowers can be so toxic but a great boom for humanity. Love the insides of them too, so unique. AZ

  3. Foxgloves are one of my favorite flowers to grow. Unfortunately, living in the Mojave Desert isn’t conducive to their growth – not to mention that my dogs tend to chew on any of the plants in my yard. Instead, I’ll just look at these beautiful photos and smile.

  4. I tried growing foxglove several times. But it never failed as soon as they grew tall and before they bloomed we would get high winds and down they would go. Too bad because they really are spectacular. I had to give up on them. I know some people that stake them which is a good idea if you have the time and the stakes.

  5. Hi, Everyone!
    This is definitely a flower to really look at and marvel. So beautiful. I haven’t tried to grow them in the desert. Not sure it would work since it takes the second year to see the flowers. I suspect I could buy them already flowering and enjoy them for a season. That would be the only way. And they are so tempting! We’ll see…

    Caris,
    Buckeye, Arizona USA

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