Shanghai

Shanghai

With twenty-four million people, Shanghai is the largest city in China by population. It is a major financial hub and has the busiest container port in the world. Shanghai is located on the east coast of mainland China. Many Jewish and Russian immigrants came to Shanghai in the early 1900s. Today, Shanghai has about 150,000 registered foreigners. For centuries, Shanghai has been a center of International trade.

Here’s an exquisite, 4-minute time-lapse video of Shanghai. Here’s an adorable 7-minute video of Shanghai street food. This 3-minute video features top-10 places to visit in Shanghai. This 12-minute personal video is a really fun look at Shanghai, with regular people and regular places with a few sights thrown in.

FunFacts about Shanghai: (Source)  

  • Basic Information, quote: Shanghai is one of the four municipalities under the direct administration of the central government of China, the largest city in China by population, and the second most populous city proper in the world, with a population of more than 24 million as of 2017. It is a global financial centre and transport hub, with the world’s busiest container port. Located in the Yangtze River Delta, it sits on the south edge of the estuary of the Yangtze in the middle portion of the East China coast. (Source)
  • Shanghai’s climate is considered a humid subtropical climate.
  • In 1554, a wall was built around Shanghai to protect the city from Japanese pirate raids.
  • In 1602, the City God Temple was built, in honor of its growing financial importance.
  • British forces occupied Shanghai during the First Opium War (1839–1842).
  • In the 1930s, Shanghai became the primary financial hub of the Asia-Pacific region.
  • Shanghai is the commercial and financial center of China.
  • The Shanghai Stock Exchange is one of the world’s largest.
  • Shanghai geography, quote: The Old City and modern downtown Shanghai are now located in the center of an expanding peninsula between the Yangtze River Delta to the north and Hangzhou Bay to the south, formed by the Yangtze’s natural deposition and by modern land reclamation projects. (Source)
  • The Bund is a famous waterfront section of Shanghai with many historic buildings nearby and a view to the city’s beautiful skyline.
  • Shanghai has 157 parks.
  • Chinese cinema originated in Shanghai.
  • Shanghai Disneyland opened in 2016.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed***

We have a winner! Congrats Sheryl P.!!!

For a chance to win this paranormal romance bracelet, scroll to the bottom of the page and read the details for entering. You will be leaving a comment as the entry requirement. Giveaway ends midnight, Arizona time, October 4, 2018.

September Winners: Caroline R. M., Shonda S., Kathy H., HLP!!!

August Winners: Linda O., Jodi M., Karina H., Sheryl P. and Marie S. from Tennessee!

Disclaimer: As with any food, herbal remedy, beverage or concept on this blog, be sure to contact your physician before eating, imbibing or using for medical purposes any substance discussed on this blog. Always err on the side of caution and keep yourself well-informed. ~ Caris Roane

(Photos from Pixabay ~ Pixabay is a free site, so feel free to share, pin and enjoy these wonderful photos.) 

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*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed***

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September Winners: Caroline R.M., Shonda S., Kathy H., HLP!!!

August Winners: Linda O., Jodi M., Karina H., Sheryl P. and Marie S. from Tennessee!

To be in the running for this handcrafted paranormal romance bracelet, made by yours truly, please leave a comment at the bottom of this post. Also, feel free to post comments on every Caris Roane blog, Monday thru Thursday this week, to increase your chances of winning this week’s prize drawing. Only one win per month allowed!

New contest ends midnight, Arizona time, on Thursday, October 4, 2018! On Friday, October 5th, Arizona time, I’ll select the winning blog then the winning comment. I’ll use Random.org to make my selection! You may only win once per month. International winner receives gift card.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed***

We have a winner! Congrats Sheryl P.!!!

To be entered into the giveaway drawing, please leave a comment about Shanghai. Have you ever visited this city in China? Which photo did you like best?

*** And tell us where you’re from! I’m from Buckeye, Arizona, not far from Phoenix. (That’s the Desert Southwest, USA.) ***

Above all: Live the fang!!!

Olives

Olives

I love olives. I don’t think I’ve ever met an olive I didn’t like. I enjoy them green, purple and black or any color in-between. I like them plain or stuffed. I like them in a tapenade, or enjoyed with toothpicks. I like them in about any recipe I’ve ever tried or any dish served at a restaurant. But I’ve found it’s pretty much a yay or nay with most people. So when I’m dining out and there’s a ‘nay’ across from me, I’ll usually push my bread plate nearby to catch the cast-asides. 

Here’s a fascinating 5-minute video showing how olives are processed and even stuffed. Here’s an excellent 5-minute video recipe for olive tapenade. Here’s another 5-minute video, this one featuring an olive grove, general facts about olives, and how olives are harvested. Finally, this fourth 5-minute video shows how olive oil is made.

FunFacts about Olives: (Source)  

  • Basic Information, quote: The olive, known by the botanical name Olea europaea, meaning “European olive”, is a species of small tree in the family Oleaceae, found in the Mediterranean Basin from Portugal to the Levant, the Arabian Peninsula, and southern Asia as far east as China, as well as the Canary Islands and Réunion. The olive’s fruit, also called the olive, is of major agricultural importance in the Mediterranean region as the source of olive oil; it is one of the core ingredients in Mediterranean cuisine. The tree and its fruit give their name to the plant family, which also includes species such as lilacs, jasmine, Forsythia, and the true ash trees (Fraxinus). (Source)
  • The olive tree is an evergreen shrub that is native to the Mediterranean, Africa and Asia.
  • The olive tree rarely gets bigger in height than 8–15 m (26–49 ft).
  • The leaves of the olive tree are oblong and a silvery green.
  • The trunks of the olive tree are usually gnarled and twisted.
  • The flowers of the olive tree are white.
  • Olives are harvested anywhere from green to purple.
  • The olive is a drupe. The seed is often referred to as a pit or stone.
  • Fossils indicate the olive had its origins some 20-40 million years ago.
  • Olives have been eaten since the Bronze age.
  • Olives are not native to the Americas.
  • There are an estimated 865 million olive trees worldwide.
  • Olives are inedible unless pickled. They are fermented in brine for 9 months.
  • During processing, when olives enter the pitting machine, the olives are pitted at the rate of 900 per minute.
  • Olive trees are not pollinated by insects but rather by the wind.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed***

We have a winner! Congrats Sheryl P.!!!

For a chance to win this paranormal romance bracelet, scroll to the bottom of the page and read the details for entering. You will be leaving a comment as the entry requirement. Giveaway ends midnight, Arizona time, October 4, 2018.

September Winners: Caroline R. M., Shonda S., Kathy H., HLP!!!

August Winners: Linda O., Jodi M., Karina H., Sheryl P. and Marie S. from Tennessee!

Disclaimer: As with any food, herbal remedy, beverage or concept on this blog, be sure to contact your physician before eating, imbibing or using for medical purposes any substance discussed on this blog. Always err on the side of caution and keep yourself well-informed. ~ Caris Roane

(Photos from Pixabay ~ Pixabay is a free site, so feel free to share, pin and enjoy these wonderful photos.) 

I hope you enjoyed these photos. Be sure to keep scrolling to leave a comment for the weekly prize draw. Details below!

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*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed***

We have a winner! Congrats Sheryl P.!!!

September Winners: Caroline R.M., Shonda S., Kathy H., HLP!!!

August Winners: Linda O., Jodi M., Karina H., Sheryl P. and Marie S. from Tennessee!

To be in the running for this handcrafted paranormal romance bracelet, made by yours truly, please leave a comment at the bottom of this post. Also, feel free to post comments on every Caris Roane blog, Monday thru Thursday this week, to increase your chances of winning this week’s prize drawing. Only one win per month allowed!

New contest ends midnight, Arizona time, on Thursday, October 4, 2018! On Friday, October 5th, Arizona time, I’ll select the winning blog then the winning comment. I’ll use Random.org to make my selection! You may only win once per month. International winner receives gift card.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed***

We have a winner! Congrats Sheryl P.!!!

To be entered into the giveaway drawing, please leave a comment about olives. Are you a fan? Or have you always wondered what the fuss is about? Which photo did you like best?

*** And tell us where you’re from! I’m from Buckeye, Arizona, not far from Phoenix. (That’s the Desert Southwest, USA.) ***

Above all: Live the fang!!!

Lemons

Lemons

When I was ten, the house my family rented was on a small piece of property in Orange County, California, that had a small lemon grove. My oldest brother, sister and I were latchkey kids at the time and we often snacked on the lemons by cutting them in half and sprinkling sugar on them. I can remember the sensation to this day as a real mixed pleasure. Too much lemon and we were basically squeezing our eyes shut because of the tartness. But when the balance was right, we definitely enjoyed the experience.

Lemons have been part our U.S. culture for a long time, perhaps most frequently with lemon slices included in drinking water at restaurants. Some favorites are lemon meringue pie, lemon-filled donuts, lemons served with fish, and all different kinds of lemon chicken. 

Here’s a 3-minute video on all the ways to use lemon peels. Here’s a 4-minute video on making a very simple lemon cake with lemon frosting. Here’s a 2-minute video on growing a lemon tree in a pot.

FunFacts about Lemons: (Source)  

  • Basic Information, quote: The lemon, Citrus limon(L.) Osbeck, is a species of small evergreen tree in the flowering plant family Rutaceae, native to South Asia, primarily North eastern India. The tree’s ellipsoidal yellow fruit is used for culinary and non-culinary purposes throughout the world, primarily for its juice, which has both culinary and cleaning uses. The pulp and rind (zest) are also used in cooking and baking. The juice of the lemon is about 5% to 6% citric acid, with a pH of around 2.2, giving it a sour taste. The distinctive sour taste of lemon juice makes it a key ingredient in drinks and foods such as lemonade and lemon meringue pie. (Source)
  • Lemons are thought to have originated somewhere in northern India, Myanmar or China.
  • Lemons arrived in Europe during the 2nd century AD in Ancient Rome.
  • The use of the lemon for the garden or for culinary or medicinal purposes evolved slowly in the Middle East and Europe.
  • Christopher Columbus introduced lemons to the Americas in 1493.
  • James Lind, a Scottish physician, conducted one of the first clinical trials to test the efficacy of lemons in treating scurvy.
  • The origin of the word, lemon, may be Arabic, laymūn or līmūn.
  • Lemons are a rich source of vitamin C.
  • The most common uses of lemons are, quote: Lemon juice, rind, and peel are used in a wide variety of foods and drinks. The whole lemon is used to make marmalade, lemon curd and lemon liqueur. Lemon slices and lemon rind are used as a garnish for food and drinks. Lemon zest, the grated outer rind of the fruit, is used to add flavor to baked goods, puddings, rice, and other dishes. (Source)
  • In Morocco, lemons are preserved in barrels of salt.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed***

We have a winner! Congrats Sheryl P.!!!

For a chance to win this paranormal romance bracelet, scroll to the bottom of the page and read the details for entering. You will be leaving a comment as the entry requirement. Giveaway ends midnight, Arizona time, October 4, 2018.

September Winners: Caroline R. M., Shonda S., Kathy H., HLP!!!

August Winners: Linda O., Jodi M., Karina H., Sheryl P. and Marie S. from Tennessee!

Disclaimer: As with any food, herbal remedy, beverage or concept on this blog, be sure to contact your physician before eating, imbibing or using for medical purposes any substance discussed on this blog. Always err on the side of caution and keep yourself well-informed. ~ Caris Roane

(Photos from Pixabay ~ Pixabay is a free site, so feel free to share, pin and enjoy these wonderful photos.)

I hope you enjoyed these photos. Be sure to keep scrolling to leave a comment for the weekly prize draw. Details below!

Caris Roane Home Page

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For more about my books, check out my Books Page!

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed***

We have a winner! Congrats Sheryl P.!!!

September Winners: Caroline R.M., Shonda S., Kathy H., HLP!!!

August Winners: Linda O., Jodi M., Karina H., Sheryl P. and Marie S. from Tennessee!

To be in the running for this handcrafted paranormal romance bracelet, made by yours truly, please leave a comment at the bottom of this post. Also, feel free to post comments on every Caris Roane blog, Monday thru Thursday this week, to increase your chances of winning this week’s prize drawing. Only one win per month allowed!

New contest ends midnight, Arizona time, on Thursday, October 4, 2018! On Friday, October 5th, Arizona time, I’ll select the winning blog then the winning comment. I’ll use Random.org to make my selection! You may only win once per month. International winner receives gift card.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed***

We have a winner! Congrats Sheryl P.!!!

To be entered into the giveaway drawing, please leave a comment about  lemons. Do you have a tree in your backyard? Do you cook with lemons often? Which photo did you like best?

*** And tell us where you’re from! I’m from Buckeye, Arizona, not far from Phoenix. (That’s the Desert Southwest, USA.) ***

Above all: Live the fang!!!

Elk

Elk

I had the good fortune to be at a mountain cabin in northern Arizona recently. This particular neighborhood is on the small side with just a handful of houses and cabins lining the creek on either side. But the property had elk visitors frequently during my stay and I was able to observe them both along the street in front of the cabin as well as on the opposite side of the creek feeding on the neighbor’s lawn and apparently loving it. They munched happily for hours.

I’d never seen elk up close before and two things struck me. First, elk are massive. The bulls are eight feet from nose to tail. With antlers that can reach a height of four feet, elk stand nine feet from front hooves to the tip of the longest antler tine. Secondly, each elk has a distinctive rump patch, which is lighter in color than the rest of the rust-beige-brown coat. You can’t miss the patch and you’ll recognize it often in the photos below. Elk are majestic.

This first 2-minute video starts with a bull elk bugle call and continues with several elk foraging. Bugling is part of the mating ritual.

This 7-minute video is a wonderful introduction to elk including a lot of bugling and other mating rituals like antler battling. Here’s a 7-minute video of a bull elk head-butting with a photographer who had hunkered down to wait it out. Don’t worry, it ends well. The photographer remained amazingly calm throughout. 

FunFacts about Elk: (Source) (Source)  

  • Basic Information, quote: The elk or wapiti (Cervus canadensis) is one of the largest species within the deer family, Cervidae, in the world, and one of the largest land mammals in North America and Eastern Asia. This animal should not be confused with the still larger moose (Alces alces) to which the name “elk” applies in British English and in reference to populations in Eurasia. Elk are more than twice as heavy as mule deer and have a more reddish hue to their hair coloring, as well as large, buff-colored rump patches and smaller tails. Moose are larger and darker than elk; bulls have distinctively different antlers. Elk gather in herds, while moose are solitary. (Source)
  • The deer family includes deer, elk, mouse, reindeer, caribou and roe deer, among others.
  • Elk prefer forest and forest edge habitats.
  • Elk feed on grasses, leaves, bark and plants.
  • Male elk have large antlers they grow and shed each year. Most members of the deer family do the same.
  • During the rut, or mating season, male elk engage in the following to establish dominance: Antler wrestling, posturing and bugling. The latter is a loud series of vocalizations.
    • During the rut, male elk will, quote: rub their antlers or horns on trees or shrubs, fight with each other, wallow in mud or dust, self-anoint and herd estrus females together. These displays make the male conspicuous and aids in mate selection. (Source)
  • Self-anointing is the process of covering the body with different types of matter to acquire an odor.
  • The elk rut is during the fall. A bull elk that has established dominance over other males will acquire a harem of up to 20 females or more. Bull males are at their reproductive peak at 8 years. A bull rarely has a harem after 11 years.
  • Females have a short estrus of only a day or two. Many couplings occur to achieve pregnancy. Gestation is 240-260 days. Calves are born spotted but lose these spots by the end of summer. The female gives birth away from the herd to avoid predators, but the calf is usually ready to join the herd at 2 weeks. The mothers nurse for about 2 months at which time the calves are weaned.
  • Elk antlers and their ‘velvet’ are used in traditional medicine in parts of Asia. It is also used as a dietary supplement around the world. Other deer family antlers and their velvet are used as well.
  • Velvet is described here, quote: The antler is covered in a hairy, velvet-like “skin” known as velvet and its tines are rounded, because the antler has not calcified or finished developing. (Source)
    • ‘In velvet’ is the term used to describe antlers when they haven’t yet calcified.
  • Elk have light-colored rump patches and small tails.
  • Elk migrate to reach the best elevations for the season, avoiding extreme cold or extreme heat.
  • Elk live 10-13 years in the wild, but can live up to 20 or more in captivity.
  • The formation of antlers is testosterone driven. Antlers are usually shed in the winter, after the rutting season, but begin to grow again soon after.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed***

We have a winner! Congrats Sheryl P.!!!

For a chance to win this paranormal romance bracelet, scroll to the bottom of the page and read the details for entering. You will be leaving a comment as the entry requirement. Giveaway ends midnight, Arizona time, October 4, 2018.

September Winners: Caroline R. M., Shonda S., Kathy H., HLP!!!

August Winners: Linda O., Jodi M., Karina H., Sheryl P. and Marie S. from Tennessee!

Disclaimer: As with any food, herbal remedy, beverage or concept on this blog, be sure to contact your physician before eating, imbibing or using for medical purposes any substance discussed on this blog. Always err on the side of caution and keep yourself well-informed. ~ Caris Roane

(Photos from Pixabay ~ Pixabay is a free site, so feel free to share, pin and enjoy these wonderful photos.)    

I hope you enjoyed these photos. Be sure to keep scrolling to leave a comment for the weekly prize draw. Details below!

Caris Roane Home Page

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Sign up for my newsletter!

For more about my books, check out my Books Page!

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed***

We have a winner! Congrats Sheryl P.!!!

September Winners: Caroline R.M., Shonda S., Kathy H., HLP!!!

August Winners: Linda O., Jodi M., Karina H., Sheryl P. and Marie S. from Tennessee!

To be in the running for this handcrafted paranormal romance bracelet, made by yours truly, please leave a comment at the bottom of this post. Also, feel free to post comments on every Caris Roane blog, Monday thru Thursday this week, to increase your chances of winning this week’s prize drawing. Only one win per month allowed!

New contest ends midnight, Arizona time, on Thursday, October 4, 2018! On Friday, October 5th, Arizona time, I’ll select the winning blog then the winning comment. I’ll use Random.org to make my selection! You may only win once per month. International winner receives gift card.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed***

We have a winner! Congrats Sheryl P.!!!

To be entered into the giveaway drawing, please leave a comment about  Elk. Have you ever seen them in the wild? Which photo did you like best?

*** And tell us where you’re from! I’m from Buckeye, Arizona, not far from Phoenix. (That’s the Desert Southwest, USA.) ***

Above all: Live the fang!!!

Alaska

Alaska

When I think of Alaska, I have three strong impressions. One, it’s going to be cold, really cold, during the winter months. Two, one of the four seasons won’t have sunlight and another will have too much sunlight. And finally, three, this state, also known as the ‘final frontier’, has amazing wildlife. One of its strongest industries is tourism. The others are fishing, natural gas, and oil. Like Hawaii, Alaska is an expensive place to live because of the cost of transporting goods to the state and the cost of keeping warm in the winter.

This 7-minute video features the Top 10 Reasons Not to Move to Alaska. It’s funny and informative, but be warned, a few of the images are a bit unsettling. This 3-minute video is very fun and is called ‘What It’s Like to Live in Alaska’. This 3-minute video is the sequel to the former and is called, ‘What It’s Like to Live in Alaska (Winter Edition)’. Yikes! Here’s a 5-minute video featuring some of the wildlife of Alaska.

FunFacts about Alaska: (Source)   

  • Basic Information, quote: Alaska is a U.S. state located in the northwest extremity of North America. The Canadian administrative divisions of British Columbia and Yukon border the state to the east, its most extreme western part is Attu Island, and it has a maritime border with Russia (Chukotka Autonomous Okrug) to the west across the Bering Strait. To the north are the Chukchi and Beaufort seas—the southern parts of the Arctic Ocean. The Pacific Ocean lies to the south and southwest. It is the largest state in the United States by area and the seventh largest subnational division in the world. (Source)
  • Alaska has fish, oil and natural gas in abundance.
  • Tourism is an important part of Alaska’s economy.
  • Alaska became the 49th state of the United States in 1959.
  • The US purchased Alaska from Russia for 7.2 million dollars in 1867.
  • Alaska is the largest US state and is as big as the next three largest US states combined: Montana, California and Texas.
  • Alaska has approximately 2670 islands. For a list of them, go here. Because of these islands, Alaska has 34,000 miles (54,720 km) of tidal coastline.
  • The lowest Alaska temperature was recorded in 1971 and was -80 degrees F or -62 C.
  • Alaska is pretty far north so the climate is on the cold side. But because the state is as big as it is, this climate varies from region to region.
  • A number of indigenous people lived in Alaska for thousands of years prior to the arrival of Europeans. DNA work indicates these people arrived via the Bering land bridge.
  • The first Russian settlement occurred in the 17th Century, quote: Some researchers believe that the first Russian settlement in Alaska was established in the 17th century. According to this hypothesis, in 1648 several koches of Semyon Dezhnyov’s expedition came ashore in Alaska by storm and founded this settlement. (Source)
  • In 1964, the world’s second most powerful earthquake shook Alaska. It had a magnitude of 9.2 and was over 1000 times more powerful than the San Francisco earthquake of 1989.
  • The population of Alaska, from the 2010 census, was 710,231. Anchorage is the most populous city with 40% of Alaska’s total population.
  • The Iditarod Trail Dog Sled Race is one of Alaska’s most famous annual events that goes from Anchorage to Nome.
  • Juneau is the capital of Alaska. 
  • The tallest mountain in North America, Mount Denali (formerly Mount McKinley) is in Alaska.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Caroline R. M.!!!

For a chance to win this paranormal romance bracelet, scroll to the bottom of the page and read the details for entering. You will be leaving a comment as the entry requirement. Giveaway ends midnight, Arizona time, September 27, 2018.

September Winners: Shonda S., Kathy H., HLP!!!

August Winners: Linda O., Jodi M., Karina H., Sheryl P. and Marie S. from Tennessee!

Disclaimer: As with any food, herbal remedy, beverage or concept on this blog, be sure to contact your physician before eating, imbibing or using for medical purposes any substance discussed on this blog. Always err on the side of caution and keep yourself well-informed. ~ Caris Roane

(Photos from Pixabay ~ Pixabay is a free site, so feel free to share, pin and enjoy these wonderful photos.) 

I hope you enjoyed these photos. Be sure to keep scrolling to leave a comment for the weekly prize draw. Details below!

Caris Roane Home Page

~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~

Sign up for my newsletter!

For more about my books, check out my Books Page!

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Caroline R. M.!!!

September Winners: Shonda S., Kathy H., HLP!!!

August Winners: Linda O., Jodi M., Karina H., Sheryl P. and Marie S. from Tennessee!

To be in the running for this handcrafted paranormal romance bracelet, made by yours truly, please leave a comment at the bottom of this post. Also, feel free to post comments on every Caris Roane blog, Monday thru Thursday this week, to increase your chances of winning this week’s prize drawing. Only one win per month allowed!

New contest ends midnight, Arizona time, on Thursday, September 27, 2018! On Friday, September 28th, Arizona time, I’ll select the winning blog then the winning comment. I’ll use Random.org to make my selection! You may only win once per month. International winner receives gift card.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Caroline R. M.!!!

To be entered into the giveaway drawing, please leave a comment about Alaska. Have you ever visited Alaska? Which photo did you like best? Feel free to share whatever comes to mind and share from the heart.

*** And tell us where you’re from! I’m from Buckeye, Arizona, not far from Phoenix. (That’s the Desert Southwest, USA.) ***

Above all: Live the fang!!!

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

To this day, I can remember the first tomato I ever ate straight off the vine. My mother had a gorgeous vegetable garden, but for some reason she planted her tomatoes near the porch all by themselves. The sun was shining and she asked if I’d like to try one. She even had salt ready, I think because this was her lunch. I said, ‘yes’ though I had no idea what to expect. OMG. The tomato was sun-warmed, the salt the perfect spice, and it was delicious. I only came close to duplicating the experience once, many years ago, when I grew my own tomatoes for the first time in my backyard and they turned out wonderful. Hooray for mothers and the first experiences they often provide our young minds and taste buds.

Here’s a 2-minute video on pruning your tomato bushes or vines to get bigger fruit. Here’s a wonderful, 10-minute video on making tomato soup from scratch. Here’s a 3-minute video featuring Jamie Oliver’s tomato salad.

FunFacts about Tomatoes: (Source)  

  • Basic Information, quote: The tomato is the edible, often red, berry of the nightshade Solanum lycopersicum, commonly known as a tomato plant. The species originated in western South America. The Nahuatl (Aztec language) word tomatl gave rise to the Spanish word tomate, from which the English word tomato derived. Its use as a cultivated food may have originated with the indigenous peoples of Mexico. The Spanish discovered the tomato from their contact with the Aztec during the Spanish colonization of the Americas and brought it to Europe. (Source)
  • The tomato is a fruit botanically but a vegetable in the kitchen.
  • Tomato vines will grow in size anywhere from 1–3 meters (3–10 ft).
  • Tomato vines have weak stems and need support.
  • The vines are usually covered with small hairs. The hairs can become roots when they come into contact with the soil.
  • Tomato fruit is classified as a berry.
  • Interesting factoid about lack of taste in commercial tomatoes, quote: The poor taste and lack of sugar in modern garden and commercial tomato varieties resulted from breeding tomatoes to ripen uniformly red. (Source)
  • In 2014, world production was 171 million tons with China leading the way at 31% of the total tomatoes produced.
  • There are 7500 tomato varieties.
  • Heirloom tomatoes have become increasingly popular for their distinctive flavors.
  • The heaviest tomato ever harvested occurred in 2008. It weighed 3.51 kg (7 lb 12 oz).
  • It is best to keep tomatoes at room temperature rather than to refrigerate them. The colder temp can diminish the flavor of the tomato.
  • Unripe tomatoes can be kept in a paper bag to encourage ripening.
  • The leaves and stems of tomato plants are toxic.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Caroline R. M.!!!

For a chance to win this paranormal romance bracelet, scroll to the bottom of the page and read the details for entering. You will be leaving a comment as the entry requirement. Giveaway ends midnight, Arizona time, September 27, 2018.

September Winners: Shonda S., Kathy H., HLP!!!

August Winners: Linda O., Jodi M., Karina H., Sheryl P. and Marie S. from Tennessee!

Disclaimer: As with any food, herbal remedy, beverage or concept on this blog, be sure to contact your physician before eating, imbibing or using for medical purposes any substance discussed on this blog. Always err on the side of caution and keep yourself well-informed. ~ Caris Roane

(Photos from Pixabay ~ Pixabay is a free site, so feel free to share, pin and enjoy these wonderful photos.) 

I hope you enjoyed these photos. Be sure to keep scrolling to leave a comment for the weekly prize draw. Details below!

Caris Roane Home Page

~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~

Sign up for my newsletter!

For more about my books, check out my Books Page!

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Caroline R. M.!!!

September Winners: Shonda S., Kathy H., HLP!!!

August Winners: Linda O., Jodi M., Karina H., Sheryl P. and Marie S. from Tennessee!

To be in the running for this handcrafted paranormal romance bracelet, made by yours truly, please leave a comment at the bottom of this post. Also, feel free to post comments on every Caris Roane blog, Monday thru Thursday this week, to increase your chances of winning this week’s prize drawing. Only one win per month allowed!

New contest ends midnight, Arizona time, on Thursday, September 27, 2018! On Friday, September 28th, Arizona time, I’ll select the winning blog then the winning comment. I’ll use Random.org to make my selection! You may only win once per month. International winner receives gift card.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Caroline R. M.!!!

To be entered into the giveaway drawing, please leave a comment about tomatoes. Have you ever grown them in your garden? Which photo did you like best? Feel free to share whatever comes to mind and share from the heart.

*** And tell us where you’re from! I’m from Buckeye, Arizona, not far from Phoenix. (That’s the Desert Southwest, USA.) ***

Above all: Live the fang!!!

Ferns

Ferns

In past years, I have successfully grown ferns, in the ground, here in the desert. I had a lovely patch on the well-shaded, north side of my house and cut them on a regular basis for flower arrangements. I love the way ferns look from the exotic fiddlehead to the unfurling of a lacy leaf. But what I love even more about ferns is that some species have the ability to remove heavy metals and arsenic from contaminated areas. As humanity has progressed, we’ve also done damage. Partnering with nature, like ferns and mushrooms, will be one avenue for saving and restoring the planet.

Here’s a 5-minute video featuring a recipe for sauteing fiddleheads. Here’s a 2-minute video with beautiful footage of ferns and several basic facts. Here’s a 4-minute video about several evergreen ferns that do well in shade and the occasional period of drought.

FunFacts about Ferns: (Source)  

  • Basic Information, quote: A fern is a member of a group of vascular plants (plants with xylem and phloem) that reproduce via spores and have neither seeds nor flowers. They differ from mosses by being vascular, i.e., having specialized tissues that conduct water and nutrients, in having branched stems and in having life cycles in which the sporophyte is the dominant phase. Like other vascular plants, ferns have complex leaves called megaphylls, that are more complex than the microphylls of clubmosses. (Source)
  • There are 10,560 known species of ferns.
  • Ferns appear in the fossil record 360 million years ago.
  • The fern Osmunda claytoniana has remained unchanged for 180 million years.
  • Ferns reproduce by means of spores.
  • Ferns do not produce flowers or seeds.
  • Some ferns can be used to restore contaminated areas, especially for the removal of heavy metals and arsenic from the soil.
  • Some ferns can be used for food, medicine, ornamental plants or biofertilizer.
  • A few ferns can reach 20 meters or 66 feet in height.
  • The leaves of ferns are often referred to as fronds.
  • New leaves typically unfurl from a tight spiral called a crozier or fiddlehead. The scientific term for this uncurling is ‘circinate vernation’.
  • A quarter to a third of all ferns are epiphytes which means they live on the surface of another organism and gain their nutrients and water from the surrounding environment.
  • Occasionally a fern species takes on weed-like qualities in which they colonize a specific area. Two examples are the bracken fern of the Scottish Highlands and the mosquito fern that grows in tropical lakes.
  • The usual places ferns grow are forests, wetlands or as epiphytes on tropical trees. But some species can grow on desert rock faces, in remote mountainous areas and around ponds or lakes in open fields.
  • Fern spores are nutritious so many vertebrates eat them.
  • Fiddleheads can be used as food but should be washed thoroughly then cooked well. Also, you have to use the right fiddleheads because some ferns are toxic.
  • 30,000 years ago, fern tubers were used for food in Europe.
  • The word for the study of ferns is pteridology.
  • Pteridomania, or fern-fever, is the term used to describe the Victorian craze for using ferns and the images of ferns in their surroundings.
  • Asparagus fern is not a fern.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Caroline R. M.!!!

For a chance to win this paranormal romance bracelet, scroll to the bottom of the page and read the details for entering. You will be leaving a comment as the entry requirement. Giveaway ends midnight, Arizona time, September 27, 2018.

September Winners: Shonda S., Kathy H., HLP!!!

August Winners: Linda O., Jodi M., Karina H., Sheryl P. and Marie S. from Tennessee!

Disclaimer: As with any food, herbal remedy, beverage or concept on this blog, be sure to contact your physician before eating, imbibing or using for medical purposes any substance discussed on this blog. Always err on the side of caution and keep yourself well-informed. ~ Caris Roane

(Photos from Pixabay ~ Pixabay is a free site, so feel free to share, pin and enjoy these wonderful photos.)

I hope you enjoyed these photos. Be sure to keep scrolling to leave a comment for the weekly prize draw. Details below!

Caris Roane Home Page

~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~

Sign up for my newsletter!

For more about my books, check out my Books Page!

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Caroline R. M.!!!

September Winners: Shonda S., Kathy H., HLP!!!

August Winners: Linda O., Jodi M., Karina H., Sheryl P. and Marie S. from Tennessee!

To be in the running for this handcrafted paranormal romance bracelet, made by yours truly, please leave a comment at the bottom of this post. Also, feel free to post comments on every Caris Roane blog, Monday thru Thursday this week, to increase your chances of winning this week’s prize drawing. Only one win per month allowed!

New contest ends midnight, Arizona time, on Thursday, September 27, 2018! On Friday, September 28th, Arizona time, I’ll select the winning blog then the winning comment. I’ll use Random.org to make my selection! You may only win once per month. International winner receives gift card.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Caroline R. M.!!!

To be entered into the giveaway drawing, please leave a comment about ferns. Do you grow them in your garden or have them in pots in your home? Have you ever eaten fiddleheads? Which photo did you like best? Feel free to share whatever comes to mind and share from the heart.

*** And tell us where you’re from! I’m from Buckeye, Arizona, not far from Phoenix. (That’s the Desert Southwest, USA.) ***

Above all: Live the fang!!!

Bison

Bison

Remember Dances with Wolves and the importance of the buffalo for the plains Native Americans? Historically, in the USA, we know bison as buffalo, though scientifically-speaking, a bison is not a true buffalo. This 1-minute video explains the difference and why our native bison were originally called buffalo. Bison are an iconic figure from the American West and not one of our proudest moments since it’s been estimated that the systematic extermination efforts of the buffalo reduced massive, multi-million animal herds down to a few hundred individual animals.

Here’s a wonderful excerpt about the extraordinary presence of bison in the American West before the extermination, quote: Between the Rocky Mountains and the States lying along the Mississippi River on the west, from Minnesota to Louisiana, the whole country was one vast buffalo range, inhabited by millions of buffaloes. One could fill a volume with the records of plainsmen and pioneers who penetrated or crossed that vast region between 1800 and 1870, and were in turn surprised, astounded, and frequently dismayed by the tens of thousands of buffaloes they observed, avoided, or escaped from. They lived and moved as no other quadrupeds ever have, in great multitudes, like grand armies in review, covering scores of square miles at once. They were so numerous they frequently stopped boats in the rivers, threatened to overwhelm travelers on the plains, and in later years derailed locomotives and cars, until railway engineers learned by experience the wisdom of stopping their trains whenever there were buffaloes crossing the track. . . . (Source)

Here’s an excerpt about the extermination of the American bison in the 1800s, quote: Historians estimate that there were perhaps 30 to 60 million American bison, also known as the American buffalo, roaming the American plains in the mid-19th century. By the 1880s, a few hundred wild bison living in Yellowstone Park were among the last that remained.  (Source)

This 6-minute video showcases the bison in Yellowstone National Park and ongoing conservation efforts. Here’s a 2-minute video sharing the connection of the Native American to the buffalo. Here’s a 6-minute video all about ‘Wild Thing’, a 2-ton bison that has free range of its owner’s home. The owner is a former rodeo clown and knows his way around big animals.

FunFacts about Bison: (Source)  

  • Basic Information, quote: The American bison and the European bison (wisent) are the largest surviving terrestrial animals in North America and Europe. They are typical artiodactyl (cloven hooved) ungulates, and are similar in appearance to other bovines such as cattle and true buffalo. They are broad and muscular with shaggy coats of long hair. Adults grow to approximately 2 to 3.5 metres (6 ft 7 in to 11 ft 6 in) in length and can weigh from approximately 300 kilograms (660 lb) in smaller cows, up to 1,000 kg (2,200 lb) in large bulls. American bison tend to be slightly heavier than European bison, while European bison tend to be taller than American bison. (Source)
  • Though used frequently, the term ‘buffalo’ is considered a misnomer for the bison species since they do not have true ‘buffalo’ characteristics. True native buffalo are found in Southeast Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa.
  • American bison live in river valleys and on the plains and prairies.
  • European bison live mostly in lightly wooded areas.
  • Both male and female bison have horns.
  • Bison wallow in either dry or wet depressions in the ground. Wallowing can be due to insect irritations, part of the molting process, or for grooming reasons.
  • Bison appear gentle in nature or even lazy, but they are known to attack at random.
  • Bison can move quickly at speeds up to 35 mph (56 km/h).
  • Bison have massive heads that can be used as battering rams during battle or to plow through snow.
  • Bison are ruminants, like cattle, goats and deer and live in herds.
  • Bison live mostly on grasses and sedges but also consume a wide variety of woody plants.
  • The rutting season lasts from June through September.
  • Bull males will battle for dominance.
  • Female bison can produce a calf each year depending on the quality of nutrition they’ve received over the course of the year.
  • Bison predators are humans, the brown bear, coyotes and the gray wolf.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Caroline R. M.!!!

For a chance to win this paranormal romance bracelet, scroll to the bottom of the page and read the details for entering. You will be leaving a comment as the entry requirement. Giveaway ends midnight, Arizona time, September 27, 2018.

September Winners: Shonda S., Kathy H., HLP!!!

August Winners: Linda O., Jodi M., Karina H., Sheryl P. and Marie S. from Tennessee!

Disclaimer: As with any food, herbal remedy, beverage or concept on this blog, be sure to contact your physician before eating, imbibing or using for medical purposes any substance discussed on this blog. Always err on the side of caution and keep yourself well-informed. ~ Caris Roane

(Photos from Pixabay ~ Pixabay is a free site, so feel free to share, pin and enjoy these wonderful photos.)   

I hope you enjoyed these photos. Be sure to keep scrolling to leave a comment for the weekly prize draw. Details below!

Caris Roane Home Page

~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~

Sign up for my newsletter!

For more about my books, check out my Books Page!

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Caroline R. M.!!!

September Winners: Shonda S., Kathy H., HLP!!!

August Winners: Linda O., Jodi M., Karina H., Sheryl P. and Marie S. from Tennessee!

To be in the running for this handcrafted paranormal romance bracelet, made by yours truly, please leave a comment at the bottom of this post. Also, feel free to post comments on every Caris Roane blog, Monday thru Thursday this week, to increase your chances of winning this week’s prize drawing. Only one win per month allowed!

New contest ends midnight, Arizona time, on Thursday, September 27, 2018! On Friday, September 28th, Arizona time, I’ll select the winning blog then the winning comment. I’ll use Random.org to make my selection! You may only win once per month. International winner receives gift card.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Caroline R. M.!!!

To be entered into the giveaway drawing, please leave a comment about bison. Have you ever seen the iconic buffalo? Which photo did you like best? Feel free to share whatever comes to mind and share from the heart.

*** And tell us where you’re from! I’m from Buckeye, Arizona, not far from Phoenix. (That’s the Desert Southwest, USA.) ***

Above all: Live the fang!!!