Persimmons

Persimmons

The most striking aspect of persimmons takes place in the fall. Not only do the leaves turn a gorgeous gold and rust-orange, but this is the time of year when the persimmon fruit ripens and turns color anywhere from a yellow to a deep red-orange. But we’re not done yet. Even when all the leaves fall off the tree, the fruit remains for a unique display of branches and fruit often all the way til winter.

This 4-minute video covers the basics of growing persimmons. Here’s a 2-minute video on making persimmon bread. Here’s a 2-minute video on making persimmon butter.

FunFacts about Persimmons: (Source)

  • Basic Information, quote: The persimmon (sometimes spelled persimon) is the edible fruit of a number of species of trees in the genus Diospyros. The most widely cultivated of these is the Asian or Japanese persimmon, Diospyros kaki. Diospyros is in the family Ebenaceae, and a number of non-persimmon species of the genus are grown for ebony timber. (Source)
  • The most common persimmon tree, the Diospyros kaki, grows to a height between 4.5 to 18 metres (15 to 60 ft). This tree can often have a willowy appearance.
    • This species is native to Japan, Myanmar, Korea, Nepal and China.
    • In the 1800s, this species was introduced to Brazil, Europe and California.
  • Persimmons mature on the tree in the fall where they can remain until winter.
  • Depending on species, the color of the fruit ranges from light yellow to dark red-orange.
  • Like tomatoes, persimmons are berries.
  • Ripe persimmons have a high glucose content and are sweet.
  • Other species are:
    • Diospyros lotus (date-plum), also known as lotus persimmon, is native to southwest Asia and southeast Europe.
    • Diospyros virginiana (American persimmon) is native to the eastern United States.
    • Diospyros nigra (black sapote / chocolate pudding fruit / black persimmon) is native to Mexico.
    • Diospyros discolor or the Mabolo or Velvet-apple is native to the Philippines.
    • Diospyros peregrina (Indian persimmon) is a slow-growing tree, native to coastal West Bengal.
    • Diospyros texana (Texas persimmon) is native to central and west Texas and southwest Oklahoma in the United States, and Mexico.
  • In 2013, China produced 43% of the world’s supply of Persimmons.
  • Persimmons are eaten dried, raw, cooked and fresh.
  • A persimmon festival is held annually in Mitchell, Indiana.
  • Persimmons provide dietary fiber, vitamin C, iron, manganese, and provitamin A beta-carotene.

*** This Week’s Giveaway ***

For a chance to win this paranormal romance bracelet, scroll to the bottom of the page and read the details for entering. You will be leaving a comment as the entry requirement. Giveaway ends midnight, Arizona time, November 15, 2018.

November Winners: Merrie W., Candy L.!!!

October Winners: Maureen D., Michelle W., Sherdina A., Sheryl P.!!!

Disclaimer: As with any food, herbal remedy, beverage or concept on this blog, be sure to contact your physician before eating, imbibing or using for medical purposes any substance discussed on this blog. Always err on the side of caution and keep yourself well-informed. ~ Caris Roane

(Photos from Pixabay ~ Pixabay is a free site, so feel free to share, pin and enjoy these wonderful photos.)  

I hope you enjoyed these photos. Be sure to keep scrolling to leave a comment for the weekly prize draw. Details below!

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*** This Week’s Giveaway ***

November Winners: Merrie W., Candy L.!!!

October Winners: Maureen D., Michelle W., Sherdina A., Sheryl P.!!!

To be in the running for this handcrafted paranormal romance bracelet, made by yours truly, please leave a comment at the bottom of this post. Also, feel free to post comments on every Caris Roane blog, Monday thru Thursday this week, to increase your chances of winning this week’s prize drawing. Only one win per month allowed!

New contest ends midnight, Arizona time, on Thursday, November 15, 2018! On Friday, November 16th, Arizona time, I’ll select the winning blog then the winning comment. I’ll use Random.org to make my selection! You may only win once per month. International winner receives gift card.

*** This Week’s Giveaway ***

To be entered into the giveaway drawing, please leave a comment about Persimmons. Have you ever eaten one or grown them? Which photo did you like best?

*** And tell us where you’re from! I’m from Buckeye, Arizona, not far from Phoenix. (That’s the Desert Southwest, USA.) ***

Above all: Live the fang!!!

Maple Trees

Maple Trees

The sugar maple tree gives us an abundance of maple syrup for our pancakes and waffles. But beyond this sweet treat, maple trees have what is called ‘tonewood‘. This means that the wood possesses tonal properties and can be used for making woodwind instruments and acoustic stringed instruments. Maple trees are found across the northern hemisphere from North America, to Europe and to Asia.

Here’s a 2-minute video on growing a maple tree from seed. Here’s a 6-minute video on how to tap a sugar maple and draw some gorgeous sap for making maple syrup. Here’s a lovely 4-minute video featuring Japanese maples.

FunFacts about Maple Trees: (Source)  

  • Basic Information, quote: Acer is a genus of trees or shrubs commonly known as maple. The genus is placed in the family Sapindaceae. There are approximately 128 species, most of which are native to Asia, with a number also appearing in Europe, northern Africa, and North America. Only one species, Acer laurinum, extends to the Southern Hemisphere. The type species of the genus is the sycamore maple, Acer pseudoplatanus, the most common maple species in Europe. (Source)
  • Most maple trees are deciduous.
  • A few maple trees in the Mediterranean and southern Asia are evergreen.
  • Maple trees range in height from 10–45 m (33–148 feet).
  • Some maples are shrubs.
  • Maple trees often have dense roots system which doesn’t allow other plants to grow beneath them.
  • Some maple trees produce root sprouts which can form a colony of maples.
  • Maple flowers are orange, red, green or yellow.
  • The fruits of maple trees are called ‘samaras’ and resemble flattened wings.
  • Nicknames for the fruit are whirlybirds, helicopters, maple keys and polynoses. They spin as they fall.
  • One maple tree can release hundreds of thousands of seeds at a time.
  • The maple leaf is on the Coat of Arms of Canada and on the Canadian flag.
  • Maple trees are popular in landscapes because they are generally fast growers, have gorgeous fall colors, and don’t have big seed pods that attack lawn machinery.
  • Maple trees are popular with bonsai enthusiasts.
  • Charcoal from maples is used to make Tennessee Whiskey.
  • Maple trees are used for maple syrup and for their wood. The sugar maple is the primary maple used for making syrup.
  • Sugar maple wood is also the main wood used for bowling pins. 

*** This Week’s Giveaway ***

For a chance to win this paranormal romance bracelet, scroll to the bottom of the page and read the details for entering. You will be leaving a comment as the entry requirement. Giveaway ends midnight, Arizona time, November 15, 2018.

November Winners: Merrie W., Candy L.!!!

October Winners: Maureen D., Michelle W., Sherdina A., Sheryl P.!!!

Disclaimer: As with any food, herbal remedy, beverage or concept on this blog, be sure to contact your physician before eating, imbibing or using for medical purposes any substance discussed on this blog. Always err on the side of caution and keep yourself well-informed. ~ Caris Roane

(Photos from Pixabay ~ Pixabay is a free site, so feel free to share, pin and enjoy these wonderful photos.) 

I hope you enjoyed these photos. Be sure to keep scrolling to leave a comment for the weekly prize draw. Details below!

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*** This Week’s Giveaway ***

November Winners: Merrie W., Candy L.!!!

October Winners: Maureen D., Michelle W., Sherdina A., Sheryl P.!!!

To be in the running for this handcrafted paranormal romance bracelet, made by yours truly, please leave a comment at the bottom of this post. Also, feel free to post comments on every Caris Roane blog, Monday thru Thursday this week, to increase your chances of winning this week’s prize drawing. Only one win per month allowed!

New contest ends midnight, Arizona time, on Thursday, November 15, 2018! On Friday, November 16th, Arizona time, I’ll select the winning blog then the winning comment. I’ll use Random.org to make my selection! You may only win once per month. International winner receives gift card.

*** This Week’s Giveaway ***

To be entered into the giveaway drawing, please leave a comment about Maple Trees. Do you have maple trees where you live? Which photo did you like best?

*** And tell us where you’re from! I’m from Buckeye, Arizona, not far from Phoenix. (That’s the Desert Southwest, USA.) ***

Above all: Live the fang!!!

Chaffinches

Chaffinches

The chaffinch nest might be one of the prettiest I’ve ever seen. Here’s how they are built, quote: The nest has a deep cup and is lined with a layer of thin roots and feathers. The outside is covered with a layer of lichen and spider silk over an inner layer of moss and grass. (Source) You’ll find footage of a real nest in the wild in the 4-minute video below.

Here’s a very sweet 2-minute video of chaffinches eating from the hand with very nice close-ups. This 1-minute video features a chaffinch singing. This is a 4-minute video of a chaffinch nest in the wild. This might be the prettiest nest ever built. The mother does feed the chicks, but unfortunately, it’s a side view so we don’t get to see the babies. This is a 1-minute video of a man in Cornwall, England who has trained chaffinches to come for a feed when he whistles.

FunFacts about Chaffinches: (Source)   

  • Basic Information, quote: The common chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs), usually known simply as the chaffinch, is a common and widespread small passerine bird in the finch family. The male is brightly coloured with a blue-grey cap and rust-red underparts. The female is much duller in colouring, but both sexes have two contrasting white wing bars and white sides to the tail. The male bird has a strong voice and sings from exposed perches to attract a mate. (Source)
  • The chaffinch lives in Europe, Asia and northwest Africa.
  • Chaffinches build their fairly large nests in the crooks of trees. These nests are built entirely by the female.
  • The female lays 4-5 eggs in each clutch and usually only 1 clutch per breeding season.
  • The eggs hatch in about 13 days and the chicks are fed a variety of foods, especially caterpillars.
  • The chicks fledge in about 2 weeks but the parents continue to feed them for several weeks after.
  • Beyond the breeding season, chaffinches form flocks and hunt for food on the ground.
  • Predators go after both the chaffinch eggs and the fledglings.
  • Chaffinches have lovely muted coloring, especially the males. The male chaffinch has a blue-gray cap, a brown saddle, an olive green rump, rust-red to creamy-pink belly, and striking white panels on black wings.
  • The chaffinch has a beautiful song. Males have as many as three different songs they sing.
  • Chaffinches don’t have long lives, primarily because of predators. The average life span is 3 years. The average survival rate for hatchlings is 53%. Despite these numbers, they thrive and are in no danger of extinction.

*** This Week’s Giveaway ***

For a chance to win this paranormal romance bracelet, scroll to the bottom of the page and read the details for entering. You will be leaving a comment as the entry requirement. Giveaway ends midnight, Arizona time, November 15, 2018.

November Winners: Merrie W., Candy L.!!!

October Winners: Maureen D., Michelle W., Sherdina A., Sheryl P.!!!

Disclaimer: As with any food, herbal remedy, beverage or concept on this blog, be sure to contact your physician before eating, imbibing or using for medical purposes any substance discussed on this blog. Always err on the side of caution and keep yourself well-informed. ~ Caris Roane

(Photos from Pixabay ~ Pixabay is a free site, so feel free to share, pin and enjoy these wonderful photos.)  

I hope you enjoyed these photos. Be sure to keep scrolling to leave a comment for the weekly prize draw. Details below!

~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~

Sign up for my newsletter!

For more about my books, check out my Books Page!

*** This Week’s Giveaway ***

November Winners: Merrie W., Candy L.!!!

October Winners: Maureen D., Michelle W., Sherdina A., Sheryl P.!!!

To be in the running for this handcrafted paranormal romance bracelet, made by yours truly, please leave a comment at the bottom of this post. Also, feel free to post comments on every Caris Roane blog, Monday thru Thursday this week, to increase your chances of winning this week’s prize drawing. Only one win per month allowed!

New contest ends midnight, Arizona time, on Thursday, November 15, 2018! On Friday, November 16th, Arizona time, I’ll select the winning blog then the winning comment. I’ll use Random.org to make my selection! You may only win once per month. International winner receives gift card.

*** This Week’s Giveaway ***

To be entered into the giveaway drawing, please leave a comment about Chaffinches. Do you have chaffinches where you live? Which photo did you like best?

*** And tell us where you’re from! I’m from Buckeye, Arizona, not far from Phoenix. (That’s the Desert Southwest, USA.) ***

Above all: Live the fang!!!

Hawaii

Hawaii

The Hawaiian islands are beautiful with gorgeous beaches and tropical plants, fruits, flowers and trees. But even more beautiful is the symbolic greeting of ‘aloha’. In American parlance, it’s thought of simply as a greeting or welcoming as well as a farewell. But ‘aloha’ has a much more gracious and healing message that comes from the spirit of the Hawaiian people. ‘Aloha‘ is the Hawaiian word for love, affection, peace, compassion and mercy. The first expression of ‘aloha’ is between a parent and a child. It also means ‘to be in the presence of the divine breath of life.’ Hawaii has been called a paradise and the islands live up to that name in many, many ways.

Here’s a mesmerizing 6-minute video about Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano. Here’s a beautiful 14-minute video mostly of Kauai. Here’s a 5-minute Expedia video about Hawaii’s Big Island.

FunFacts about Hawaii: (Source) (Source)  

  • Basic Information, quote: The Hawaiian Islands is an archipelago of eight major islands, several atolls, numerous smaller islets, and seamounts in the North Pacific Ocean, extending some 1,500 miles (2,400 kilometers) from the island of Hawaii in the south to northernmost Kure Atoll. Formerly the group was known to Europeans and Americans as the Sandwich Islands, a name chosen by James Cook in honor of the then First Lord of the Admiralty John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich. The contemporary name is derived from the name of the largest island, Hawaii Island. (Source)
  • Hawaii has 8 main islands and became the 50th U.S.  state in 1959.
  • Each Island has a different flower and color to represent it, quote:
    • Niihau – Pupu Shell – White
    • Kauai – Mokihana (Green Berry) – Purple
    • Oahu – Ilima -Yellow
    • Maui – Lokelani (Pink Cottage Rose) – Pink
    • Molokai – White Kukui Blossom – Green
    • Lanai – Kaunaoa (Yellow and Orange Air Plant) – Orange
    • Kahoolawe – Hinahina (Beach Heliotrope) – Grey
    • Big Island of Hawaii – Lehua Ohia – Red (Source)
  • The Hawaiian Islands are part of a huge, undersea mountain range called the Hawaiian-Emperor seamount chain. This is essentially a hotspot in the earth’s mantle.
  • The Hawaiian Islands are 1,860 miles (3,000 km) from the nearest continent.
  • The state of Hawaii has 137 islands, 8 are the main islands, the rest are minor islands and islets.
  • The age of the islands ranges from the Big Island at 400,000 years old to the Kure Atoll in the north which is 28 million years old.
  • About the volcanic activity on Hawaii, quote: Hawaii island (the Big Island) is the biggest and youngest island in the chain, built from five volcanoes. Mauna Loa, taking up over half of the Big Island, is the largest shield volcano on the Earth. (Source)
  • Hawaii experiences frequent earthquakes and less frequent tsunamis.
  • Hawaii has a tropical climate but has a range depending on altitude.
  • Hawaii has its own time zone: Hawaiian Standard Time.
  • Oahu draws the most tourists of all the islands.
  • Niihau has only 130 residents, no paved roads and no automobiles.
  • Most of the world supply of macadamia nuts comes from the Big Island.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Merrie W.!!!

For a chance to win this paranormal romance bracelet, scroll to the bottom of the page and read the details for entering. You will be leaving a comment as the entry requirement. Giveaway ends midnight, Arizona time, November 8, 2018.

First November Winner: Candy L.!!!

October Winners: Maureen D., Michelle W., Sherdina A., Sheryl P.!!!

Disclaimer: As with any food, herbal remedy, beverage or concept on this blog, be sure to contact your physician before eating, imbibing or using for medical purposes any substance discussed on this blog. Always err on the side of caution and keep yourself well-informed. ~ Caris Roane

(Photos from Pixabay ~ Pixabay is a free site, so feel free to share, pin and enjoy these wonderful photos.)      I hope you enjoyed these photos. Be sure to keep scrolling to leave a comment for the weekly prize draw. Details below!

~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~

Sign up for my newsletter!

For more about my books, check out my Books Page!

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Merrie W.!!!

First November Winner: Candy L.!!!

October Winners: Maureen D., Michelle W., Sherdina A., Sheryl P.!!!

To be in the running for this handcrafted paranormal romance bracelet, made by yours truly, please leave a comment at the bottom of this post. Also, feel free to post comments on every Caris Roane blog, Monday thru Thursday this week, to increase your chances of winning this week’s prize drawing. Only one win per month allowed!

New contest ends midnight, Arizona time, on Thursday, November 8, 2018! On Friday, November 9th, Arizona time, I’ll select the winning blog then the winning comment. I’ll use Random.org to make my selection! You may only win once per month. International winner receives gift card.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Merrie W.!!!

To be entered into the giveaway drawing, please leave a comment about Hawaii. Have you ever traveled to the Hawaiian Islands? Do you have a favorite of the 8 main islands? Which photo did you like best?

*** And tell us where you’re from! I’m from Buckeye, Arizona, not far from Phoenix. (That’s the Desert Southwest, USA.) ***

Above all: Live the fang!!!

Parsley

Parsley

Until doing the research for this blog, I never thought of parsley as much more than a pretty garnish or as an ingredient for olive oil and garlic pasta. But after reading up on some of the health benefits, I’m ready to add parsley to my diet on a more regular basis. I might even try the shake in the video below. But I will definitely do the ginger-parsley-lemon tea! How about you?

Here’s a 7-minute video on making fresh parsley, ginger and lemon tea.  Here’s a 3-minute video on the health benefits of parsley. Here’s a 3-minute video recipe featuring a pineapple-parsley smoothie. 

FunFacts about Parsley: (Source) (Source)

  • Basic Information, quote: Parsley or garden parsley (Petroselinum crispum) is a species of flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to the central Mediterranean region (southern Italy, Greece, Portugal, Spain, Malta, Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia), naturalized elsewhere in Europe, and widely cultivated as an herb, a spice, and a vegetable. (Source)
  • Parsley is a ‘biennial’ plant which means it takes two years to complete its life cycle.
  • Curly leafed parsley is used as a garnish.
  • Some of the nutrients of parsley are: antioxidants, folic acid, vitamins K, C and A, and lutein for eye health.
  • Parsley grows best in full sun in a moist, well-drained soil.
  • Parsley is usually grown from seed but germination takes 4-6 weeks.
  • Some swallowtail butterflies use parsley as a host plant for their larvae.
  • There are two types of parsley: leaf parsley and root parsley. Root parsley is often used in central and eastern European cuisine.
  • Root parsley can be eaten raw like a carrot.
  • Parsley’s closest relative is the parsnip.
  • Parsley contains more vitamin C than an orange.
  • Parsley is high in iron.
  • Parsley can help with cardiovascular disease and high blood pressure.
  • Parsley has anti-inflammatory properties.
  • But with all these wonderful elements, parsley should be used in moderation. Too many parsley shakes can leave you smelling of parsley. Also, there is some indication it should be avoided if you’re pregnant. Do investigate further if you have concerns.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Merrie W.!!!

For a chance to win this paranormal romance bracelet, scroll to the bottom of the page and read the details for entering. You will be leaving a comment as the entry requirement. Giveaway ends midnight, Arizona time, November 8, 2018.

First November Winner: Candy L.!!!

October Winners: Maureen D., Michelle W., Sherdina A., Sheryl P.!!!

Disclaimer: As with any food, herbal remedy, beverage or concept on this blog, be sure to contact your physician before eating, imbibing or using for medical purposes any substance discussed on this blog. Always err on the side of caution and keep yourself well-informed. ~ Caris Roane

(Photos from Pixabay ~ Pixabay is a free site, so feel free to share, pin and enjoy these wonderful photos.)      

I hope you enjoyed these photos. Be sure to keep scrolling to leave a comment for the weekly prize draw. Details below!

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Sign up for my newsletter!

For more about my books, check out my Books Page!

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Merrie W.!!!

First November Winner: Candy L.!!!

October Winners: Maureen D., Michelle W., Sherdina A., Sheryl P.!!!

To be in the running for this handcrafted paranormal romance bracelet, made by yours truly, please leave a comment at the bottom of this post. Also, feel free to post comments on every Caris Roane blog, Monday thru Thursday this week, to increase your chances of winning this week’s prize drawing. Only one win per month allowed!

New contest ends midnight, Arizona time, on Thursday, November 8, 2018! On Friday, November 9th, Arizona time, I’ll select the winning blog then the winning comment. I’ll use Random.org to make my selection! You may only win once per month. International winner receives gift card.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Merrie W.!!!

To be entered into the giveaway drawing, please leave a comment about parsley.  Were you aware of the health benefits? Do you grow parsley in your garden? Which photo did you like best?

*** And tell us where you’re from! I’m from Buckeye, Arizona, not far from Phoenix. (That’s the Desert Southwest, USA.) ***

Above all: Live the fang!!!

Forests

Forests

This was a fun blog for me to do because part of my childhood was spent in the redwood forests of Northern California. These weren’t the giant redwoods, and yes my family was there as part of the logging industry, but it was a magical place to live. There were creeks and rivers to explore throughout our forest as well as the nearby ocean. Though life in a remote village community had its share of challenges, some of them at times frightening, growing up in a forest was an enriching experience and I’m forever grateful for it. One of my favorite memories was of watching my mother harvest the rich mulch from around the base of trees and bring it back to our home to work into her vegetable garden. That was an education all by itself.

This is a fun, fascinating 8-minute video of the 17 biggest trees in the world.  Here’s a fun, 8-minute video featuring a British look at the differences between managed and unmanaged forests as well as medieval and primeval forests. This 25-minute slide-show video features 6 ancient forests and lots of information. The photos are gorgeous and there’s an evocative soundtrack. 

FunFacts about Forests: (Source)   

  • Basic Information, quote: A forest is a large area dominated by trees. Hundreds of more precise definitions of forest are used throughout the world, incorporating factors such as tree density, tree height, land use, legal standing and ecological function. According to the widely used Food and Agriculture Organization definition, forests covered 4 billion hectares (9.9×109 acres) (15 million square miles) or approximately 30 percent of the world’s land area in 2006. (Source)
  • At different latitudes and elevations, forests form three very different ecozones:
    • boreal forests near the poles
    • tropical forests near the equator
    • temperate forests at mid-latitudes
  • The boreal forest is also known as taiga and it is the largest ‘biome’ apart from the oceans. Think Russia and Canada. A biome is a community of plants and animals that have common characteristics relating to their shared environment.
  • The tropical forests are located in places like Brazil, Africa and Southeast Asia. Another word for these forests is ‘jungle’.
  • The third type of forest is the temperate forest. These are located in areas with the widest seasonal changes. They are also called: deciduous, coniferous, broadleaf and mixed forest and rainforest.
  • There are more than 800 definitions of ‘forests’ around the world.
  • A forest is usually defined as a local area with the presence of trees. However, some areas are called forests if they once had trees or might have trees in the future.
  • The first forests appeared 380 million years ago.
  • Forests consist of many living components, quote: trees, shrubs, vines, grasses and other herbaceous (non-woody) plants, mosses, algae, fungi, insects, mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and microorganisms living on the plants and animals and in the soil. (Source)
  • There are four parts to a forest: the forest floor, the understory, the canopy and the emergent layer. The latter usually refers to those trees in a tropical forest that tower over the canopy.
  • Forests provide a lot of good things for the earth: they convert carbon dioxide into oxygen, they induce rainfall, they purify water, and they act as a ‘carbon sink’ which can help prevent climate change.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Merrie W.!!!

For a chance to win this paranormal romance bracelet, scroll to the bottom of the page and read the details for entering. You will be leaving a comment as the entry requirement. Giveaway ends midnight, Arizona time, November 8, 2018.

First November Winner: Candy L.!!!

October Winners: Maureen D., Michelle W., Sherdina A., Sheryl P.!!!

Disclaimer: As with any food, herbal remedy, beverage or concept on this blog, be sure to contact your physician before eating, imbibing or using for medical purposes any substance discussed on this blog. Always err on the side of caution and keep yourself well-informed. ~ Caris Roane

(Photos from Pixabay ~ Pixabay is a free site, so feel free to share, pin and enjoy these wonderful photos.)   

I hope you enjoyed these photos. Be sure to keep scrolling to leave a comment for the weekly prize draw. Details below!

~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~

Sign up for my newsletter!

For more about my books, check out my Books Page!

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Merrie W.!!!

First November Winner: Candy L.!!!

October Winners: Maureen D., Michelle W., Sherdina A., Sheryl P.!!!

To be in the running for this handcrafted paranormal romance bracelet, made by yours truly, please leave a comment at the bottom of this post. Also, feel free to post comments on every Caris Roane blog, Monday thru Thursday this week, to increase your chances of winning this week’s prize drawing. Only one win per month allowed!

New contest ends midnight, Arizona time, on Thursday, November 8, 2018! On Friday, November 9th, Arizona time, I’ll select the winning blog then the winning comment. I’ll use Random.org to make my selection! You may only win once per month. International winner receives gift card.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Merrie W.!!!

To be entered into the giveaway drawing, please leave a comment about forests. Have you had the pleasure of living in or near one? Do you vacation in areas with forests so you can hike in them? Which photo did you like best?

*** And tell us where you’re from! I’m from Buckeye, Arizona, not far from Phoenix. (That’s the Desert Southwest, USA.) ***

Above all: Live the fang!!!

Beavers

Beavers

Huge disclaimer: When I first began collecting photos of beavers, other names would appear in the photo descriptions as well, especially the coypu (also known as the nutria) and the muskrat. Here’s the deal: Though all three are semiaquatic rodents, nutria and muskrats are NOT beavers. Each is a separate species, with beavers being significantly bigger. But as rodents, they share very similar body and facial features. I’ve included the links (above) with their names in case you’d like to see how much these animals resemble the beaver visually. As best I could, I eliminated photos that could have been of a nutria or a muskrat, but I’m only about 90% certain I succeeded. With all best intentions, the photos below are of beavers. Of course, in a twist of irony, in the second video below, a pair of muskrats had taken up lodgings inside one of the beaver homes. 

Here’s a 2-minute video about beavers and dam building.  Here’s a 4-minute video also on beaver dam and lodge building. This 4-minute ‘science show’ video covers a lot of funfacts about beavers.

FunFacts about Beavers: (Source)  

  • Basic Information, quote: The beaver (genus Castor) is a large, primarily nocturnal, semiaquatic rodent. Castor includes two extant species, the North American beaver (Castor canadensis) (native to North America) and Eurasian beaver (Castor fiber) (Eurasia). Beavers are known for building dams, canals, and lodges (homes). They are the second-largest rodent in the world (after the capybara). (Source)
  • During the Ice Age, beavers were quite large and could grow up to 8 feet long and weigh 200 pounds.
  • Today, beavers are one of the largest rodents on earth.
  • Beavers have ‘goggles’ as in a pair of transparent eyelids they use when swimming.
  • Beavers build big homes called ‘lodges’ or ‘castles’. These are made of stones, branches, vegetation and mud.
  • Beavers use their powerful front incisors to chop down trees for building lodges. These trees, however, regrow in the form of coppices, in which the trees regrow from smaller shoots off their trunks. These coppices in turn provide additional future food for the beavers.
  • Beaver dams can be an encroachment on land used for specific purposes by humans. But generally, these dams enrich and sustain the health of the waterway and support the local vegetation and wildlife.
  • Beavers have webbed hind feet and broad, scaly tails.
  • Beavers have poor eyesight but keen senses of smell, touch and hearing.
  • Beavers are designed for working in water, not out of it. While building a dam, they will construct canals for floating their building materials to the dam’s location.
  • Beaver lodges have underwater entrances for protection against predators.
  • Beavers have broad tails and will dive and slap their tails on the water to sound an alarm.
  • Beavers can stay underwater for 15 minutes if necessary.
  • Beavers don’t hibernate but are active through the winter.
  • The average beaver dam is 10 – 100 meters long, or 32 – 320 feet long. However, the biggest beaver dam in existence is in northern Alberta, Canada and can be seen from space. It is 850 meters long or 2788 feet. For more info, go here.
  • Beavers have been around for 20 million years.
  • Because beavers’ teeth are strengthened with iron, their teeth are orange in color.
  • Beavers’ teeth grow continuously.
  • Beavers use stones to weigh down the base of each dam.
  • The dams serve nature. They help prevent floods and droughts.
  • Beavers, with all their activity, become very strong and can lift their own body weight in timber.
  • It takes about 3 weeks for beavers to build a massive, 3-ton lodge using raw materials of timber, vegetation, rocks and mud.
  • A lodge has only underwater entrances and each is concealed.
  • Beavers are organized by families, including an adult pair, their kits and their yearlings. Sometimes even two-year-olds will stay with the family if needed.
  • Everyone in the family works. Both male and female raise the young, build the lodge and defend the territory.
  • Beaver pairs mate for life.
  • In the spring, beavers give birth to an average of 3-4 kits that are the size of guinea pigs.
  • Females nurse their young for 2 months. But from only three-days-old, the kits start cutting their teeth on vegetation.
  • Some of beavers’ favorite foods are cattails, willow, aspens, water lilies and pond weed.
  • Beavers produce a marking scent called castoreum that smells like sweetened vanilla.
  • Beavers can weigh as much as 55 pounds or 25 kilograms.
  • Beavers can live up to 24 years in the wild.
  • The beaver is the national animal of Canada.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Merrie W.!!!

For a chance to win this paranormal romance bracelet, scroll to the bottom of the page and read the details for entering. You will be leaving a comment as the entry requirement. Giveaway ends midnight, Arizona time, November 8, 2018.

First November Winner: Candy L.!!!

October Winners: Maureen D., Michelle W., Sherdina A., Sheryl P.!!!

Disclaimer: As with any food, herbal remedy, beverage or concept on this blog, be sure to contact your physician before eating, imbibing or using for medical purposes any substance discussed on this blog. Always err on the side of caution and keep yourself well-informed. ~ Caris Roane

(Photos from Pixabay ~ Pixabay is a free site, so feel free to share, pin and enjoy these wonderful photos.) 

I hope you enjoyed these photos. Be sure to keep scrolling to leave a comment for the weekly prize draw. Details below!

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*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Merrie W.!!!

First November Winner: Candy L.!!!

October Winners: Maureen D., Michelle W., Sherdina A., Sheryl P.!!!

To be in the running for this handcrafted paranormal romance bracelet, made by yours truly, please leave a comment at the bottom of this post. Also, feel free to post comments on every Caris Roane blog, Monday thru Thursday this week, to increase your chances of winning this week’s prize drawing. Only one win per month allowed!

New contest ends midnight, Arizona time, on Thursday, November 8, 2018! On Friday, November 9th, Arizona time, I’ll select the winning blog then the winning comment. I’ll use Random.org to make my selection! You may only win once per month. International winner receives gift card.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats Merrie W.!!!

To be entered into the giveaway drawing, please leave a comment about beavers. Have you ever seen beavers building a dam? Which photo did you like best?

*** And tell us where you’re from! I’m from Buckeye, Arizona, not far from Phoenix. (That’s the Desert Southwest, USA.) ***

Above all: Live the fang!!!

The Amazon Rainforest

The Amazon Rainforest

In the 1500s, Francisco de Orellana was the first explorer to travel the entire length of the Amazon River. In doing so, he encountered a number of tribes with which he had to do battle. Noting that the women of the Tapuya tribe in particular battled alongside their male counterparts, he named the river, the Amazon, in reference to the warrior women of the same name found in the writings of Herodotus and Diodorus.  The Amazon Rainforest is also known as Amazonia and the Amazon Jungle. Francisco’s name stuck.

Here’s a 3-minute video featuring a part of the Amazon River that has boiling temperatures. This 8-minute video features 10 amazing facts about the Amazon rainforest. This 9-minute slide-show video shares a bunch of facts about the rainforest.

FunFacts about The Amazon Rainforest: (Source)  

  • Basic Information, quote: The Amazon rainforest, also known in English as Amazonia or the Amazon Jungle, is a moist broadleaf forest in the Amazon biome that covers most of the Amazon basin of South America. This basin encompasses 7,000,000 km2 (2,700,000 sq mi), of which 5,500,000 km2 (2,100,000 sq mi) are covered by the rainforest. This region includes territory belonging to nine nations. (Source)
  • 60% of the forest is in Brazil.
  • The Amazon rainforest has 390 billion trees.
  • The Amazon rainforest is located across nine nations.
  • The rainforest is believed to be 55 million years old.
  • The top layer of trees in the Amazon rainforest can grow as tall as 200 feet.
  • Half the species of animals known to man live in the rainforest.
  • The rainforest is home to 2.5 million species of insects.
  • The rainforest has the largest biodiversity of animals and plants in the world.
  • The Amazon rainforest contributes 20% of the planet’s oxygen.
  • The rainforest covers 2.5 million square miles.
  • The Amazon River is 4000 miles long.
  • Most of the rainforest is on or near the equator.
  • The Amazon rainforest averages 260 inches of rain annually, but this figure can climb as high as 400.
  • Where the elevation of the rainforest is in the mountains, the top of the forest is covered in a mist. These areas are called ‘cloud forests’.
  • Some of the tarantulas in the rainforest can grow to the size of dinner plates.
  • The dust of the North African Saharan Desert, specifically from the country of Chad, is important to the health of the Amazon basin. This dust is high in phosphorus, an important chemical for plant growth. 50 million tons of dust blows across the Atlantic each year.
  • Human habitation of the Amazon rainforest began over 11000 years ago.
  • Here’s a summation of the dangers to be found in the Amazon rainforest, quote: The rainforest contains several species that can pose a hazard. Among the largest predatory creatures are the black caiman, jaguar, cougar, and anaconda. In the river, electric eels can produce an electric shock that can stun or kill, while piranha are known to bite and injure humans. Various species of poison dart frogs secrete lipophilic alkaloid toxins through their flesh. There are also numerous parasites and disease vectors. Vampire bats dwell in the rainforest and can spread the rabies virus. Malaria, yellow fever and Dengue fever can also be contracted in the Amazon region. (Source)
  • Deforestation of the Amazon rainforest is an ongoing problem. For information on this issue, go here.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats: Candy L.!!!

For a chance to win this paranormal romance bracelet, scroll to the bottom of the page and read the details for entering. You will be leaving a comment as the entry requirement. Giveaway ends midnight, Arizona time, November 1, 2018.

October Winners: Maureen D., Michelle W., Sherdina A., Sheryl P.!!!

September Winners: Caroline R. M., Shonda S., Kathy H., Helen P.!!!

Disclaimer: As with any food, herbal remedy, beverage or concept on this blog, be sure to contact your physician before eating, imbibing or using for medical purposes any substance discussed on this blog. Always err on the side of caution and keep yourself well-informed. ~ Caris Roane

(Photos from Pixabay ~ Pixabay is a free site, so feel free to share, pin and enjoy these wonderful photos.)    

I hope you enjoyed these photos. Be sure to keep scrolling to leave a comment for the weekly prize draw. Details below!

~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~   ~ ~ ~

Sign up for my newsletter!

For more about my books, check out my Books Page!

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats: Candy L.!!!

October Winners: Maureen D., Michelle W., Sherdina A., Sheryl P.!!!

September Winners: Caroline R. M., Shonda S., Kathy H., Helen P.!!!

To be in the running for this handcrafted paranormal romance bracelet, made by yours truly, please leave a comment at the bottom of this post. Also, feel free to post comments on every Caris Roane blog, Monday thru Thursday this week, to increase your chances of winning this week’s prize drawing. Only one win per month allowed!

New contest ends midnight, Arizona time, on Thursday, November 1, 2018! On Friday, November 2nd, Arizona time, I’ll select the winning blog then the winning comment. I’ll use Random.org to make my selection! You may only win once per month. International winner receives gift card.

*** This Week’s Giveaway is Closed ***

We have a winner! Congrats: Candy L.!!!

To be entered into the giveaway drawing, please leave a comment about The Amazon. Have you ever visited this part of South America? Which photo did you like best?

*** And tell us where you’re from! I’m from Buckeye, Arizona, not far from Phoenix. (That’s the Desert Southwest, USA.) ***

Above all: Live the fang!!!